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The public is outraged, calling for an apology

The Constitution doesn’t lay out policies on how much to pay either so the Republican critics can be wrong.

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Sen. Mazie Hirono, D-Hawaii, has come under fire for comments in which she argues that it is impossible to discern the Founding Fathers’ viewpoints when interpreting the Constitution and poses the question, “Who the Hell would know what our Founding Fathers meant?”

Following last month’s Supreme Court decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health, Hirono made the remark during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Tuesday. After a video of her comments went viral online, the comment sparked backlash on Twitter.

Chaos erupted in the comments, with detractors pointing out the “straightforward” text of the Constitution and citing The Federalist Papers as additional illustration of the founders’ viewpoints.

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“most illiterate and uneducated member in Congress. Perhaps the Federalist Papers? “Buzz Petterson, a columnist at RedState, wrote.

Dan O’Donnell, the host of the postcast, also chimed in, stating, “People who know how to read,” in response to Hirono’s query.

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While the Georgia Log Cabin Republicans viciously charged that Hirono’s reading comprehension must be “abysmally low,” former Republican candidate for the Rhode Island congressional seat Bob Lancia attacked Hirono, saying she should be “embarrassed” for her remarks.

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Nick Freitas, a member of the Virginia House of Delegates, and Dr. Sebastian Gorka, the former president Trump’s deputy assistant, also offered their opinions. Gorka’s comments came across less subtly because he outright called Hirono “stupid as a box of rocks.”

In contrast, Freitas used irony in his response, writing, “I know, correct? If only they had documented the type of arguments they were presenting and their supporting evidence—possibly in several books, articles, and journals.”

More detractors criticized Hirono’s inconsistency in asserting that the Constitution cannot be properly interpreted with its original intent while holding public office and brought up her promise to uphold and defend the Constitution.

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