Connect with us

News

‘Funny Girl’ Producers deny they were blindsided by the exit of Beanie Feldstein

On July 31, 2019, Beanie Feldstein announced that she will be leaving the Broadway production of Funny Girl. In recent days, people have been speculating over who caused her to decide to leave.

Published

on

In recent days, social media has been ablaze with speculation that the producers of the Broadway production of Funny Girl may have been caught off guard by Beanie Feldstein’s decision to leave the show.

Feldstein made the announcement on Instagram on Sunday, announcing that she would be departing the show on July 31. Earlier this month, it was announced that she and Jane Lynch would be stepping down from their jobs at the end of the year, rather than the end of the year as originally planned. After the show’s producers “decided to take the show in a different path,” Feldstein claimed in her article that they “changed their decision.”

Producers cast Lea Michele as Fanny Brice, then Tovah Feldshuh as her substitute, the following day.

Funny Girl producers may have been surprised by Feldstein’s cryptic Instagram post, which prompted suspicion that the Glee actress’ long and public desire to play Fanny Brice in the show sparked her quick departure and the rapid news of Michele’s hire.

Advertisement

As People reported on Wednesday, the producers and Feldstein’s representative issued a joint statement to refute rumors.

The reply said, “The Funny Girl producers were not surprised by Beanie’s social media post. As a result of this decision, Beanie’s contract will be terminated on September 25, six months sooner than expected.”

A month following that choice, Beanie felt it was better for her to depart on July 31st,” the statement added. Her decision was supported by the producers, who were aware of it. Throughout this process, the producers and Beanie worked together respectfully and gracefully.”

The Hollywood Reporter has contacted Feldstein’s representatives and the show’s producers for additional information.

Advertisement

To read the complete article, click here.

Advertisement