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Biden promises to tackle climate change after Manchin’s vote

After talks on climate and other items broke down, Biden called for a bill to be passed to lower prescription drug costs.

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Washington, DC — He promised Friday to take “strong executive action” in response to climate change after Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va, scuttled his efforts to resurrect major pieces of the president’s domestic legislative agenda.

When Manchin, the Democratic senator from West Virginia, rejected proposals to combat climate change and raise taxes on the wealthy as part of a spending package with Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-New York, President Obama declared he “won’t back down.”

While in the Middle East, Vice President Joe Biden issued a statement saying, “Action on climate change and clean energy remains more urgent than ever.” In other words, if the Senate refuses to take action on climate change and strengthen our domestic clean energy industry, I will take strong executive action to meet this moment.

No specific executive actions were mentioned by Vice President Biden, but he did say they would aim to create jobs, improve energy security for the United States, strengthen the manufacturing and supply chains, as well as combat global warming Executive actions on climate change by Vice President Biden are yet to be seen to have the same force as legislation..

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Also, Vice President Joe Biden urged the Senate to pass legislation to lower prescription drug prices and extend Obamacare subsidies, two areas in which he and other Democrats have found common ground.

More: Manchin cites concerns about a ‘inflation fire’ as the reason for halting spending negotiations.

It all started with this.

It’s been reported that Manchin told Schumer that “he will not support” a reconciliation bill that includes energy and climate change provisions or raises taxes on the wealthiest Americans and corporations.

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In an interview with West Virginia radio host Hoppy Kercheval on Friday, Manchin rejected the notion that he had blown talks. After the July inflation figures are released in August, he plans to make a decision on what can be passed without increasing consumer prices even more.

The inflation figures will be released in July, so I asked Chuck, ‘Chuck, can we just wait?’” Manchin made the statement. In my opinion, “no” was the correct answer. According to Senator, “In my opinion, I’d prefer a change in the weather. We need an energy strategy.”

For negotiations, what this means.

Democrats estimate that Schumer’s final proposal would reduce carbon emissions by nearly 40% by 2030 if it included tax credits to encourage the use of clean energy.

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Reasons why Biden’s defeat is so heartbreaking

Democrats, led by Vice President Joe Biden, had grand plans to overhaul the economy and social safety net while also enacting the most significant climate legislation in the history of the United States. President Obama’s “Build Back Better” plan to spend $3.5 trillion over the next decade has been almost completely dismantled. In the past, proposals for universal pre-kindergarten, free community college, national paid family leave and extending child tax credits were omitted.

Sen. Chuck Schumer revived talks with West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin in a final-minute effort to save some of President Trump’s agenda, particularly on climate change, before November’s midterm elections. It was hoped that the White House would be able to pass legislation via reconciliation, which would allow Democrats to bypass a potential Republican filibuster with a simple majority, but doing so would require the support of all 50 Democratic senators.

Following the 40-year high in inflation, Manchin said he would not support anything “that adds to the problem.” A decade away from relying solely on renewable sources of energy, he said, would be impossible. As a citizen of the United States, I refuse to be a part of a movement that would deprive our economy and the lives of our citizens of what they need to thrive.

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Refusing to discuss the latest budget negotiations publicly, the White House remained silent. Karine Jean-Pierre, the press secretary for the White House, also refused to say whether Manchin had informed the administration of his plans.

Manchin was slammed by progressives. It’s strange that Sen. Manchin would choose as his legacy to be the one man who single-handedly doomed humanity,” former senior advisor to Barack Obama and founder of the Center for American Progress think tank John Podesta said. “However, we cannot give up on the planet. Now more than ever, President Biden must use every ounce of his authority to ferociously advocate for the future of the United States.”

More: Inflation reaches a new record high of 40 years. The next Fed rate hike and what it means for consumers are two separate questions.

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Yet again, Democrats have failed to unite behind a progressive agenda in power despite being in charge of the White House and both chambers of Congress. In the first two years of Joe Biden’s presidency, it has become one of the most prominent trends that has emerged. Time is running out for Democrats to pass major legislation ahead of November’s midterm elections.

Also, Manchin’s unique position as an outspoken Democratic defector once again emerged. More than $730,000 in campaign contributions from the oil and gas industry have been received by a moderate Democrat from one of the country’s largest coal-producing states during the 2022 election cycle, according to Open Secrets.

There are no good options left for Schumer and the Democrats. They could put forward a bill to take on prescription drug prices and extend ACA subsidies and claim a victory, but it would come at the expense of many of the priorities that progressives have demanded for years.

On Twitter, you can find Joey Garrison at @joeygarrison.

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USA TODAY published the following article: After Sen. Manchin shatters the domestic agenda, Biden promises’strong executive action’ on climate change.

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